Close Menu

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The genetic ancestry of European Americans, Latinos, and African Americans in the United States is more diverse than some might have assumed and regional differences in genetic ancestry reflect historical events, according to a new study by 23andMe and collaborators at Harvard Medical School.

The study, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics today, is based on data from 23andMe customers who described themselves as belonging to one of three groups — about 148,800 European Americans, 8,700 Latinos, and 5,300 African Americans.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

GenomeWeb Premium gives you:
✔ Full site access
✔ Interest-based email alerts
✔ Access to archives

Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

You may already have institutional access!

Check if I qualify.

Already a GenomeWeb or 360Dx Premium member?
Login Now.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Register for Free Content
You can still register for access to our free content.

SARS-CoV-2 vaccine developers are evaluating further vaccine doses as well as modified doses to keep up with new viral variants, according to CNN.

The New York Times reports that a new viral variant of concern has been identified in New York City.

In Nature this week: spatiotemporally resolved map of the human cell cycle, folding single-cell RNA sequencing into cancer drug studies, and more.

CNN reports that a US Food and Drug Administration document says Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine meets the requirements to receive an Emergency Use Authorization.

Mar
16
Sponsored by
Bio-Rad

Wastewater based epidemiology (WBE) has been established as a viable, valuable, and cost-effective means to monitor infectious disease within a community. 

Mar
23
Sponsored by
Roche

This webinar will discuss findings from the study, in which molecular residual disease (MRD) was assessed using circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) without prior mutational knowledge in oligometastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who had received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This study also investigated urine as an alternative analyte for ctDNA MRD detection.