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Oxford Genetics Licenses CRISPR IP From ERS Genomics

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Oxford Genetics announced today that it has taken a nonexclusive license to CRISPR/Cas9-related intellectual property held by ERS Genomics.

Under the terms of the deal, Oxford Genetics may use technology covered by the IP to provide genome-engineering services, as well as in cell line development and gene therapy viral vector improvement. The license also permits use of the technology in the development and sale of research tools and reagents, and in the use of CRISPR-edited cell lines for biotherapeutic manufacturing.

Additional terms were not disclosed.

"Licensing the CRISPR gene-editing technology from ERS Genomics is another step on our journey to establishing the most efficient and integrated service portfolio in this sector," Oxford Genetics CCO Paul Brooks said in a statement. "We are excited to be adding this technology to our existing portfolio in the synthetic biology space and supporting the rapidly expanding market for products and services that utilize genome-engineering technologies."

ERS was founded in 2014 by Max Planck researcher Emmanuelle Charpentier and financier Shaun Foy to commercialize CRISPR patent rights held by Charpentier. The IP is currently at the center of a legal dispute between Max Planck, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Broad Institute.

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