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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – By fusing a nucleotide-flipping enzyme to Cas9, scientists from Harvard University have developed a new way to edit point mutations without making a double-stranded break. Though presently limited in which base conversions it can make, the technique could reduce the effect of unwanted indels in gene editing and could be applied to correct mutations associated with genetic diseases.

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The Washington Post reports that a US Senate committee voted this week to approve the nomination of Stephen Hahn to lead the Food and Drug Administration.

Nature News reports that gene therapy approaches are tackling sickle cell disease, but that the cost of treatment is a concern.

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