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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Kevin Ness has a vision: the CEO of gene editing company Inscripta wants to make CRISPR technology as ubiquitous as DNA sequencing. He believes there's just one problem — too many researchers can't get their hands on the basic tools they need.

"All the CRISPR research that could be done isn't being done because people don't have access to the enzymes, and that's a problem that we're looking to solve — getting complete, unrestricted, open access to these enzymes immediately," he said.

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In PLOS this week: Mycobacterium abscessus linked to gastric conditions, placental gene expression changes associated with preterm birth, and more.

The Guardian reports that UK universities are looking into ways to reduce labs' reliance on single-use plastics.

People with certain gene variants tend to not like vegetables, particularly bitter ones, CNN reports.

MIT's Technology Review reports on a company's genetic test that gauges an embryo's susceptibility to certain diseases.

Nov
13
Sponsored by
Agena Bioscience

This webinar will discuss advances in detecting MET and NTRK variants in tumor samples, which can help clinicians determine the appropriate therapy for cancer patients.