NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Scientists are using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to record a cell's history in its own DNA, answering questions such as where the cell came from in development, also known as cell lineage tracing, and what biochemical events it has encountered during its lifespan.

To trace cell lineage in early vertebrate development, Jay Shendure of the University of Washington and Alexander Schier of Harvard University led a team that created arrays of synthetic targets in the genome that could pick up different edits as the cells underwent ongoing rounds of division.

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In PLOS this week: grey wolf population genomics, mutations associated with lung adenocarcinoma survival, and more.

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.

Dec
03
Sponsored by
Advanced Cell Diagnostics

This webinar will demonstrate how a research team at the National Institutes of Health evaluated a novel in situ hybridization approach and applied it to study splice variants related to schizophrenia.

Dec
04
Sponsored by
Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss the use of clinical-grade exome analysis application in complex case investigations.