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Covance to Collaborate with Broad Institute on microRNA Research

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Covance today said that it will collaborate with the Broad Institute on microRNA expression research on an unidentified research model.

Princeton, NJ-based Covance said that the collaboration will utilize its next-generation sequencing capabilities to profile microRNA expression in various tissue samples from the model, which the firm said has proven valuable for understanding various human diseases including respiratory, oncology, and cardiovascular diseases.

"In collaborating with the Broad Institute on this project, our shared hope is that parallel characterization of microRNA expression will contribute to our understanding of the underlying transcriptional regulatory networks," said Tom Turi, VP of Science and Technology for Covance Discovery and Translational Services. "These studies will rapidly expand our current knowledge of this area, laying the ground work for in-depth investigation of biomedically-relevant disease processes."

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