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U of Washington, Pharmigene Resolve IP Dispute, Reach Licensing Deal

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The University of Washington and Pharmigene today announce the resolution of a patent dispute and the subsequent licensing of technology to Pharmigene for determining proper dosing for the anti-coagulant drug warfarin.

The agreement settles a patent interference "concerning previously competing applications that describe methods to determine proper dosing of … warfarin," the two firms said in a joint statement. No additional details were provided.

Pharmigene now has the global licensing rights to VKORC1-1639 SNP-related patents and application from the University of Washington and Academia Sinica.

Dennis Hanson, technology manager at the University of Washington Center for Commercialization, said in a statement that the deal is a "positive outcome for both parties, resolving a complex IP rights situation, and allows for the further development of the market for this valuable diagnostic test. The wide adoption of this test will undoubtedly help physicians better manage a very real problem with a useful but potentially dangerous therapy."

Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Based in Palo Alto, Calif., Pharmigene develops genetic tests. In November, it licensed IP to the Mayo Clinic for the development of a companion diagnostic for Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

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