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Pairings: Oct 20, 2010

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The Institute of Medicine announced the names of 65 new members and five foreign associates at its 40th annual meeting last week. Election to the IOM is awarded to leaders in the field of medicine "who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service," according to the institute.

Below is a short list of new IOM members in the field of genetics: Bruce Gelb, professor of pediatrics and genomics and genetic sciences at Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Carol Greider, director of the department of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Neil Risch, director of the Institute for Human Genetics, University of California-San Francisco; Joseph St. Geme III, James B. Duke Professor at the department of molecular genetics and microbiology at Duke University School of Medicine; David Altshuler, chief academic officer of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT; Riccardo Dalla-Favera, professor of pathology, genetics and development at Columbia University Medical Center; Titia de Lange, professor of laboratory of cell biology and genetics at Rockefeller University; and Charis Eng, professor and vice chair of the department of genetics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

The Scan

Interfering With Invasive Mussels

The Chicago Tribune reports that researchers are studying whether RNA interference- or CRISPR-based approaches can combat invasive freshwater mussels.

Participation Analysis

A new study finds that women tend to participate less at scientific meetings but that some changes can lead to increased involvement, the Guardian reports.

Right Whales' Decline

A research study plans to use genetic analysis to gain insight into population decline among North American right whales, according to CBC.

Science Papers Tie Rare Mutations to Short Stature, Immunodeficiency; Present Single-Cell Transcriptomics Map

In Science this week: pair of mutations in one gene uncovered in brothers with short stature and immunodeficiency, and more.