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Nuclea Tech, Boston Medical Center Partner on Cancer Gene Expression Biomarkers

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Nuclea Technologies today announced a deal with Boston Medical Center for the discovery of new gene expression biomarkers to diagnose cancer.

Under the partnership, research will be directed at gene expression in specific tumors to help radiologists "review results in a different and more comprehensive way," Nuclea said in a statement.

Based in Pittsfield, Mass., Nuclea discovers and develops genetic, protein, and antibody biomarkers and diagnostic assays.

Nuclea will pay BMC $1.4 million over three years to support the research. The company will have right of first refusal for commercialization of all new discoveries related to biomarker development, biomarker arrays, and methods for new diagnostic and radiological interpretations.

BMC's department of pathology and laboratory medicine, under the direction of Daniel Remick, and its department of radiology, under the direction of Alexander Norbash, will jointly conduct the research. Nicolas Block will serve as principal investigator for the radiology department.

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