Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Myriad Genetics to Split Stock Next Month

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Myriad Genetics said after the close of the market on Tuesday that its board of directors has approved a two-for-one split of the firm's common stock, which will take effect next month.

The Salt Lake City-based molecular diagnostics firm said that the split would be effected in the form of a dividend, which is payable on March 25 to shareholders of record at the close of business on March 9. Under the split, shareholders will receive one additional share for each share held.

As a result of the split, Myriad will have around 95 million shares outstanding.

In addition, the split will alter the number of shares distributed to current shareholders in Myriad Pharmaceuticals, the proposed spinoff of Myriad's drug development business, which is expected to take place in the second quarter. Myriad has initially intended to grant its shareholders a half share of Myriad Pharmaceuticals stock for each share of Myriad Genetics held. Now, the firm expects to issue one quarter of a share in the new entity.

In early Wednesday trade on the Nasdaq, Myriad's shares were up 2 percent at $83.77.

The Scan

Enzyme Involved in Lipid Metabolism Linked to Mutational Signatures

In Nature Genetics, a Wellcome Sanger Institute-led team found that APOBEC1 may contribute to the development of the SBS2 and SBS13 mutational signatures in the small intestine.

Family Genetic Risk Score Linked to Diagnostic Trajectory in Psychiatric Disorders

Researchers in JAMA Psychiatry find ties between high or low family genetic risk scores and diagnostic stability or change in four major psychiatric disorders over time.

Study Questions Existence of Fetal Microbiome

A study appearing in Nature this week suggests that the reported fetal microbiome might be the result of sample contamination.

Fruit Fly Study Explores Gut Microbiome Effects on Circadian Rhythm

With gut microbiome and gene expression experiments, researchers in PNAS see signs that the microbiome contributes to circadian rhythm synchronicity and stability in fruit flies.