NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) — The Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative will use Affymetrix's DMET Plus biomarker panel for a national study of markers for drug response, Affy said today.

The CPMC, a branch of the Coriell Institute for Medical Research, is using the panel to expand studies it has already been conducting with Affy's Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to identify genes that are associated with complex health conditions, such as diabetes, cancer, and heart and blood vessel diseases.

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Though many details have yet to be worked out, the draft deal for the UK's withdrawal from the EU is giving researchers some hints for what they can expect, Nature News says.

DNA testing has solved a 100-year-old mystery contained in the skull and teeth samples of a now-extinct monkey that once inhabited Jamaica, Gizmodo reports.

As the UN ponders a ban on gene drives, one malaria researcher says there are less dramatic ways to fight the disease in Africa than unleashing GM mosquitoes on a whole continent.

In Nature this week: an improved reference genome of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, genomes of four species of truffles, and more.

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Schott

This webinar will discuss how understanding the relative performance characteristics of glass and polymer substrates for in vitro diagnostic applications such as microarrays and microfluidics can help to optimize diagnostic performance.

Dec
04
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Sophia Genetics

This webinar will discuss the use of clinical-grade exome analysis application in complex case investigations.

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PerkinElmer

This webinar describes a study that used two independent next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms to gain insight into the impact of different types of aneuploidies during preimplantation genetic testing.

Dec
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Sponsored by
Illumina

This webinar will discuss the use of shotgun metagenomics to identify children at risk of hospital-acquired infection.