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Benjamin Reed, David Bell, David Fitzpatrick, Beatrice Perotti, Per Artur Peterson, Frank Witney, Lynn Busteed

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Oxford Genome Sciences has hired several new executives for its UK and US business branches, the company said last week.
 
Benjamin Reed, formerly of Ciphergen Biosystems, has been named the new business development director for the company’s UK biomarker services division.
 
David Bell, who was at GlaxoSmithKline for 18 years, has joined the company’s UK mass spectrometry operations  
 
The company has also named David Fitzpatrick and Beatrice Perotti to its pre-clinical group in San Francisco. Fitzpatrick, who previously worked at Immunex and at Amgen, will head the pre-clinical group and Perotti, who formerly worked at Pfizer and at Amgen, will lead preclinical development programs.
 

 
Per Artur Peterson has been appointed to Entelos’ board as a non-executive editor, the company said last week.
 
Peterson formerly was chairman of research and development and an executive committee member at Johnson & Johnson. Peterson also previously led the division of molecular immunogenetics at the Scripps Research Institute.
 

 
Transgenomic has named Frank Witney to its board of directors.
 
Witney is president, CEO and director of Panomics, and is a director of Applied Precision. He also has been president of PerkinElmer’s drug-discovery business and was COO of Packard Biosciences.
 

 
Enigma Diagnostics last week named Lynn Busteed to be its new CEO and director.
Busteed was previously vice president for corporate development at Focus Diagnostics and was senior director of business development and strategic planning at Celera Genomics.

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