By Turna Ray

"Another year gone, and the lessons from the Human Genome Project have yet to yield the medical breakthroughs promised."

That was the undertone of many personalized medicine discussions throughout 2010, a year that marked the tenth anniversary of the Human Genome Project. The verdict by many observers of the field can be summed up by a New York Times article that concluded that the project's primary goal to "ferret out the genetic roots of common diseases … remains largely elusive."

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Some breweries are using DNA-based testing to determine whether unwanted bacteria are affecting their beers, The Verge reports.

Standardized N-of-1 trials will be needed to test out personalized medicines, writes Nicholas Schork from the J. Craig Venter Institute at Nature.

In Science this week: factors influencing retrotransposon integration sites, and more.

A bioethicist argues for the responsible use of germline gene editing.