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NEW YORK – Swiss startup QGel has developed a series of synthetic extracellular matrices (ECMs) based on biological, biophysical, and biochemical parameters that it believes researchers can use to mimic organs and tumors to test cancer drugs on a variety of cell types outside the human body. 

The Lausanne-based firm is in the midst of a $60 million financing round to enter the clinical testing phase and eventually commercialize its technology to offer organoid-based services to pharmaceutical companies to help accelerate drug development. 

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AstraZeneca has released its coronavirus vaccine trial protocol, according to the New York Times.

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In PNAS this week: similar muscle protein patterns across hypertrophic cardiomyopathy phenotypes, analysis of gene expression and brain anatomy in major depression, and more.

Oct
06
Sponsored by
10x Genomics

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and fatal lung disease characterized by irreversible scarring of the distal lung, leading to respiratory failure. 

Oct
13
Sponsored by
Lexogen

This webinar will outline the use of targeted protein degradation (TPD) to understand transcriptional processes at a high kinetic resolution.