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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Neural cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells can give insight into what drugs might treat schizophrenia, according to a new study.

Current drugs to treat people with schizophrenia are only effective in a portion of patients, as about two-thirds either don't respond to treatment or only partially respond. However, a lack of models has limited the ability to develop new therapies, the authors of the new study said.

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A group of statisticians wants to eliminate researchers' reliance on 'statistical significance,' according to NPR.

Newsweek discusses the privacy issues raised by digital medicine.

In Nature this week: genetic analysis of Anatolian farmers, cotton genome analysis, and more.

Matt Hancock, the UK health secretary, is calling for the swift rollout of predictive genetic tests, the Guardian reports.

Mar
27
Sponsored by
Swift Biosciences

Sequencing workflows require library quantification and normalization to ensure data quality and reduce cost. 

Apr
23
Sponsored by
N-of-One

In 2016, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), in partnership with the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and American College of Molecular Genetics (ACMG), launched a set of guidelines meant to set industry standards for reporting of molecular diagnostic test results in oncology, using a tier-based system and defined levels of evidence. 

Apr
24
Sponsored by
Biocrates

This webinar will provide a wide-ranging overview of the promise for metabolomics in studying human health and disease, as well as its potential for integration with other -omics disciplines.

May
08
Sponsored by
Sysmex Inostics

This webinar will present recent evidence that demonstrates how incorporating circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assessments into real-world patient management can influence patient care decisions, alter radiographic interpretations, and impact clinical outcomes.