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NEW YORK – New drugs are more likely to be approved if they target a gene linked to disease, according to a new analysis from AbbVie researchers that confirms earlier findings. 

Only between 5 percent and 10 percent of new drug candidates that enter early-stage clinical trials are eventually approved. In 2015, researchers led by GlaxoSmithKline's Philippe Sanseau reported that drugs with supporting genetic evidence were twice as likely to be approved.

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Bloomberg Law writes that the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act may work better as a privacy, rather than anti-discrimination, law.

TechCrunch reports that Linda Avey has a new personal genomics startup that's focusing on India.

A new report finds that though the US has increased its activity in science and engineering, its global share of that activity has fallen in some areas, according to Inside Higher Ed.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of rapeseed, universal target enrichment method for metagenomic sequencing, and more.

Feb
20
Sponsored by
Thermo Fisher Scientific

This webinar will discuss the use of 3’ mRNA sequencing to reduce the cost of gene expression studies on Illumina NGS systems.

Feb
26
Sponsored by
Autogen

This webinar will explain how the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg, Pennsylvania, has transformed its DNA workflows to improve the diagnosis and treatment of genetic illnesses that are prevalent in the pediatric population of its community.