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NEW YORK – New drugs are more likely to be approved if they target a gene linked to disease, according to a new analysis from AbbVie researchers that confirms earlier findings. 

Only between 5 percent and 10 percent of new drug candidates that enter early-stage clinical trials are eventually approved. In 2015, researchers led by GlaxoSmithKline's Philippe Sanseau reported that drugs with supporting genetic evidence were twice as likely to be approved.

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European regulators have begun a rolling review of Russia's Sputnik V SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, Reuters reports.

Science reports that Science Foundation Ireland is seeking annual budget increases.

According to the Financial Times, a UK university group is pushing Elsevier to lower its journal fees.

In Nature this week: satellite tracking and genome sequencing combination used to examine migration patterns of peregrine falcons, and more.

Mar
17
Sponsored by
IONPath

In this webinar, Felix J. Hartmann of Stanford University will describe an approach that characterizes the metabolic regulome of individual cells together with their phenotypic identity.

Mar
24
Sponsored by
Mission Bio

This webinar, the first in a “Women in Single Cell” series sponsored by Mission Bio, will discuss the use of single-cell analysis to assess genome editing for use in pre-clinical disease modeling.

Mar
31
Sponsored by
MilliporeSigma

This webinar will outline the development and commercialization journey of a novel CRISPR-based SARS-CoV-2 test. 

Apr
06
Sponsored by
Beckman Coulter

In this webinar session, Dr. David Harris and Dr. Ryan Sprissler, who led the student and employee testing program at University of Arizona, will discuss how the university has remained physically open with nearly 25 percent of its population on campus, while keeping infection rates below 2 percent.