Zika virus

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: approach for mapping enhancers and their targets, comparative protein interaction analysis of dengue and Zika viruses, and more.

With long-read sequencing, mapping, and other approaches, researchers assembled a high-quality genome for Aedes aegypti, a notorious infectious disease vector.

Cytokine patterns could be useful as biomarkers for identifying pregnant women whose babies may be at risk of developing Zika-linked abnormalities.

Researchers trained a machine-learning model to predict animal reservoirs or insect vectors for dozens of "orphan" viruses with unknown natural sources.

Using biorepository strains, researchers from the J. Craig Venter Institute and elsewhere profiled Zika virus consensus sequences, variant patterns, and phylogenetics.

The test is designed to detect the presence or absence of the Zika virus in serum or plasma collected alongside urine from patients with suspected infection.

The test can be used on donated blood samples as well as other human cells and tissues.

The FDA said that pooled testing of donations using a screening test that it has licensed is a sufficient method for complying with its testing regulations.

Researchers sequenced 61 Zika virus genomes isolated from patients in the region to reconstruct viral movements.

The claim, enabling streamlined screening of pooled samples, follows updated industry recommendations for Zika virus screening in the US blood supply.

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Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

John Mendelsohn, a former president of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has died, the New York Times reports.

Identical twins receive different estimates of ancestry from the same direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms, CBC reports.

In PNAS this week: chromosomal features of maize, adaptations in the vinous-throated parrotbill, and more.