Zika virus

The test was approved for lab use, but it runs on a platform with the potential for point-of-care applications.

Dubbed "Sherlock," the new technology has demonstrated potential in detecting viruses and bacteria as well as human SNPs and mutations in cell-free DNA.

The test is based on the company's portable diagnostic platform and can qualitatively detect Zika RNA in human serum.

The method uses graphene-coated silica particles fused to complementary RNA to register impedance changes in the presence of viruses.

Scripps researchers estimate that there could have been as many as 30 different introductions of the Zika virus into Florida, Medscape Medical News says.

The company will use the funds to work in collaboration with George Mason University to apply its technology to detecting viruses in non-invasive samples.

The FDA granted Abbott Emergency Use Authorization for the assay in serum, plasma, and urine in November. 

A study by Brazilian researchers identified cellular processes affected by the virus that could explain the brain malformations associated with the disease.

The firm said that it is on track to seek FDA approval for a liquid cytology solution early this year.

The Big Ones of 2016

The biggest biology stories of the year include the Zika virus, CRISPR, and more, according to Wired.

Pages

Dog DNA testing finds that some purebreds might not truly be purebreds, Inside Edition reports.

Mary Beckerle has returned as director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute, according to ScienceInsider.

Smithsonian Magazine reports that environmental DNA sampling can be used to track elusive organisms.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive satellite DNA in the fruit fly, transcriptome map assembly pipeline, and more.