urinary tract infection

As part of the deal, which is worth at least $3 million for the first five years, Primerdesign will develop and supply 384-well plate molecular assay panels for Genesis.

The company said it expects to submit its Acuitas assay for common causes of urinary tract infections to the US Food and Drug Administration early next year.

Using meat and clinical samples collected prospectively over a year, researchers found evidence for poultry-to-human transmission of Escherichia coli sequence type 131.

The award will go toward the development of MicrobeDx's technology for detecting the presence of bacteria in clinical urine specimens and to which antibiotics they are susceptible.

Using genetic probes and fluorescent scanning, the firm plans to market the $20 test for pathogens that cause urinary tract infections and biological warfare.

The test cartridge runs on the company's Unyvero platform and covers 103 diagnostic targets for various pathogens and markers of antibiotic resistance.

OpGen recently launched the first Acuitas test, which is designed to detect the most common bacterial causes of complicated urinary tract infections.

The firm will begin initial trials for antibiotic-resistant urinary tract infection detection in UK hospitals in early 2018.

GenomeDx will have exclusive rights to distribute the molecular tests in most of the US, while Pathnostics continues to perform the assays in-house.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: gene-environment interactions affecting BMI, transposon mutagenesis study of UTI-linked bacteria, and more.

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An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.