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The UK developers believe that their device has the potential for multiplex testing at the point of care using solid-state nanopore sensing with DNA probes.

The firm will use its solid-state nanopore technology to develop a point-of-care molecular diagnostic device to detect tuberculosis in low-resource areas. 

In Science this week: genetic mutations typically associated with esophageal cancer are common in older, healthy individuals, and more.

The genomic analysis also found that drug resistance mutations have appeared locally, suggesting that the issue can still be addressed region by region.

The PCR assay is intended to help detect TB-causing bacteria and determine if it harbors mutations associated with isoniazid and rifampicin resistance.

A preliminary analysis based on high-resolution metabolomics pointed to three blood plasma metabolites with apparent ties to active, pulmonary tuberculosis.

The court ruled that Roche's claims are patent-ineligible because they are "directed to a natural phenomenon and lack any inventive concept" for a patent.

Already, public health organizations in the UK, the Netherlands, and New York state are moving toward implementing NGS for tuberculosis drug susceptibility testing.

The firm has been placing point-of-care systems primarily in the private sector, but may have increased access once it completes WHO prequalification review.

The amplicon sequencing method, called resistance mutation sequencing (RM-seq), may help in detecting resistance earlier than traditional techniques.

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As the Canadian election season heats up, neither major party has really paid much attention to science, according to Nature News.

BBC News says the uncertainty over Brexit is affecting science funding in the UK.

A new app purports to tell users "how gay" they are by looking at their DNA, but experts tell Futurism that the app is bunk.

In Nature this week: human and great ape cerebral organoids reveal aspects of brain development unique to humans, and more.