sepsis

The company's Life Sciences segment was up 17 percent year over year, while its Diagnostics business grew 8 percent.

The firm attributed growth to a diversified geographic footprint and comprehensive offerings based on three key in vitro diagnostics technologies.

Formerly known as SlipChip Corp, the firm has recently won nearly $10 million in funding to hone its approaches to sepsis and CT/NG testing.

Collaborators said that the test is accurate and reliable for the rapid detection of the most common gram-positive bacteria responsible for bloodstream infections.

It is the first of three ePlex molecular multiplex panels for the diagnosis and management of bloodstream infections that can lead to sepsis.

The assay detects a mutation that can confer hearing loss in patients, particularly neonates, who have taken gentamicin, an antibiotic prescribed for certain bacterial infections.

The funding totals up to $5.6 million over five years and will incorporate Talis' proprietary SlipChip technology.

The new funding from Business Finland comes on the heels of a successful financing round announced last week.

The blood-based test could eventually become a rapid point-of-care diagnostic in the ICU, with startup Microbiome as a commercial vehicle.

The study identified one genetic and three protein-based biomarkers associated with outcome in Pseudomonas bloodstream infections.

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Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

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With H3Africa, Charles Rotimi has been working to bolster the representation of African participants and African researchers in genomics, Newsweek reports.