sepsis

The Stanford spinout has launched an infectious disease test that sequences cell-free pathogen DNA to diagnose sepsis in immunocompromised patients.

The firm has completed submissions for all three of its ePlex panels for diagnosis and management of bloodstream infections that can lead to sepsis.

Clinicians identifying and treating S. aureus bloodstream infections reduced the median length of stay by 5.6 days and hospital cost by $13,341 per patient after using Luminex's assay.

A proof-of-concept version of the method takes less than eight hours to perform ID-AST directly from whole blood. 

The company's Life Sciences segment was up 17 percent year over year, while its Diagnostics business grew 8 percent.

The firm attributed growth to a diversified geographic footprint and comprehensive offerings based on three key in vitro diagnostics technologies.

Formerly known as SlipChip Corp, the firm has recently won nearly $10 million in funding to hone its approaches to sepsis and CT/NG testing.

Collaborators said that the test is accurate and reliable for the rapid detection of the most common gram-positive bacteria responsible for bloodstream infections.

It is the first of three ePlex molecular multiplex panels for the diagnosis and management of bloodstream infections that can lead to sepsis.

The assay detects a mutation that can confer hearing loss in patients, particularly neonates, who have taken gentamicin, an antibiotic prescribed for certain bacterial infections.

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This year's Breakthrough Prize winners include a pair that developed a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy.

The New York Times reports on how white supremacists misconstrue genetic research, concerning many geneticists.

Researchers find that people's genetics influence their success at university, but that it is not the only factor.

In Nature this week: approach to identify genetic variants that affect trait variability, application of read clouds to microbiome samples, and more.