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Salmonella

By sequencing ancient Salmonella enterica isolates, investigators retraced the history of the bug in humans transitioning to pastoral and agricultural lifestyles.

In Nature this week: resources for single-cell analysis, little overlap in the microRNAs used by Salmonella and Shigella to infect host cells, and more.

Canadian food inspectors are relying on whole-genome sequencing to track foodborne pathogens, the CBC reports.

The firm claims that its Clear Safety platform will help food safety professionals detect food-borne pathogens and prevent outbreaks across the US.

Tracing the Bugs

The Wall Street Journal reports on the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's use of genetic approaches to study foodborne illnesses.

In Nature this week: Salmonella enterica uncovered in 16th century Mexico cemeteries, reconstruction of Hans Jonatan's genome, and more.

In PNAS this week: host contributors to typhoid fever risk, effects of obesity-related variants near TMEM18, and more.

Scientists at Duke University have found that a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels can potentially increase a patient's risk of contracting typhoid fever.

The firm said that a number of hospitals and labs are expected to evaluate the panel, presenting it with about a $2.0 million annual revenue opportunity.  

The technology is identifying sources of foodborne pathogen outbreaks more quickly and precisely than older technology. 

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The Lancet has made changes to its peer-review process in response to its recent retraction of a COVID-19-related paper, Science reports.

The New York Times reports that a series of emails show how Department of Health and Human Services officials sought to silence the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A new initiative aims to move Australia's genome sequencing labs onto one system, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

In PLOS this week: recessive mutation tied to early-onset dilated cardiomyopathy, epigenetic analysis of lung adenocarcinoma, and more.