Salmonella

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: Salmonella enterica uncovered in 16th century Mexico cemeteries, reconstruction of Hans Jonatan's genome, and more.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: host contributors to typhoid fever risk, effects of obesity-related variants near TMEM18, and more.

Scientists at Duke University have found that a gene variant that affects cholesterol levels can potentially increase a patient's risk of contracting typhoid fever.

The firm said that a number of hospitals and labs are expected to evaluate the panel, presenting it with about a $2.0 million annual revenue opportunity.  

The technology is identifying sources of foodborne pathogen outbreaks more quickly and precisely than older technology. 

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: SNP reference panel from the Haplotype Reference Consortium, and more.

Different clades of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis are behind the self-limiting and invasive diseases the bacterium causes in different parts of the world.

Scientists from the Colorado School of Mines have proposed a method to complement mass spec-based protein profiling. 

Researchers from Germany, Austria, and the US found that non-coding RNA produced by pathogenic bacteria can influence transcripts produced by both the microbe itself and the infected host.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: recombination density-based method for calibrating human mutation rates, pathogen-typing approach using solid-state nanopores, and more.

Pages

In PLOS this week: grey wolf population genomics, mutations associated with lung adenocarcinoma survival, and more.

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.