retinitis pigmentosa

To study the benefit of genetic testing data, the Foundation Fighting Blindness offered free clinical testing to 100 members of its My Retina Tracker patient registry.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: 3D genome structures, CRISPR approach prevents retinitis pigmentosa in mice, and more.

A blind woman in Texas has been treated with an optogenetic therapy, Technology Review reports.

For several reasons, scientists, as well as gene editing therapy company Editas, think that the first clinical trials for CRISPR-based cures will be for hereditary eye diseases.

The study hints that iPSCs derived from patients with the hereditary disease could be edited ex vivo and reintroduced to fix damaged retinas.

Genable Technologies, an Irish biopharmaceutical firm, announced last week that it has received orphan drug status from the US Food and Drug Administration for its expressed RNAi-based treatment for retinitis pigmentosa.

Irish biopharmaceutical firm Genable Technologies announced this week that it has acquired an exclusive, worldwide license to Benitec Biopharma's expressed RNAi technology for use in a treatment for the rare ocular disease rhodopsin-linked autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

The newly named Washington University Genome Institute intends to move beyond research-oriented sequencing projects and toward those with a clinical bent.

The United Nations is to consider a ban on field testing gene drives at a meeting being held next week, Technology Review reports.

The Associated Press reports that gene-edited food may soon be for sale.

The US Department of Health and Human Services is beginning a series of meetings on human fetal tissue research, Stat News reports.

In Cell this week: epigenetic change linked to glioblastomas, rare and low-frequency variants contributing to multiple sclerosis risk, and more.