radiation exposure

The Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority aims to produce at least two US Food and Drug Administration-cleared tests.

DxTerity aims to develop a genomic blood test to identify which cancer patients are most likely to benefit from radiation therapy or are at risk for toxicity.

With exome sequences, RNA sequences, and methylation profiles, investigators uncovered differences between radiation-induced and sporadic forms of meningioma.

The developers said such a signature could help triage people exposed to radiation through war, a terrorist attack, or an industrial accident.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: DNA Fountain for storing data in DNA, and more.

The firm plans to seek Emergency Use Authorization for the 18-gene panel and will subsequently submit it to the FDA for full approval.

Genome sequencing suggests secondary tumors present after ionizing radiation treatment tend to contain numerous deletions and balancing inversions.

The additional funds bring the total contract to $43 million over approximately eight years.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases plans to provide $21 million next year to support a network of research centers that will develop medical countermeasures, including biomarkers and diagnostics tools, for radiological or nuclear emergencies.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — A multi-institution research collaborative led by scientists at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute has entered into the second phase of a government-funded project to develop a qPCR-based multi-gene expression assay to rapidly assess an individual's exposure to

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Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.