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This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: genome sequencing analysis of Egyptian bat, "chemistry-first" approach to find personalized lung cancer treatment targets, and more.

In Genome Research this week, mismatch repair deficiency in C. elegans, retracing transcriptions start site evolution in the human genome, and more. 

The firm said total test volumes rose 55 percent during the quarter, and test volumes for its SelectMDx liquid biopsy test nearly tripled in Europe.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week, new genes associated with prostate cancer risk, genetic patterns in M. bovis, and more.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: hair color genes, hybridization between 13-year and 17-year cicadas, and more.

Targets for Treatment

UK researchers have uncovered about 80 proteins that could be targeted to treat prostate cancer, the Times reports.

At a time of rapid growth in the consumer genetics space, PerkinElmer and NorthShore are developing digital apps to ease access to genetic disease risk information through Helix.

PerkinElmer is working on an app that reports pathogenic or likely pathogenic ACMG-59 genetic variants, and NorthShore's app will report a prostate cancer risk score.

The single approach could be useful in some of the same areas where combinations of technologies have been implemented, such as AR-V7 testing in prostate cancer.

Physicians and prostate cancer patients are beginning to turn to genomic tests to guide treatment decisions, according to the Wall Street Journal.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.