preterm birth

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: variants linked to risk of preterm birth, microbiome of New York's money, and more.

The agreement will allow Sera to leverage LabCorp's sales force and networks, but similar deals have failed to deliver for proteomics firms in the past.

Sera plans to make the test for preterm birth available nationwide this year with LabCorp as the exclusive US distributor.

A health-economic model of the company's preterm birth test found it could lower infant mortality by 23 percent and yield annual savings of around $500 million.

The partners will evaluate new biomarkers that they both find, and will assess the possibility for a preterm birth prognostic panel.

The study generated a number of three-protein panels that identified women at risk of giving birth preterm with sensitivity and specificity of above 80 percent.

According to one physician familiar with the test, it is a much needed diagnostic tool, but without insurance coverage it is too expensive for wide use.

Published this week in AJOG, the study found that the test could predict delivery before 37 weeks with 75 percent sensitivity and 74 percent specificity.

In a recent study, a pair of proteins identified women who went on to deliver preterm with specificity and sensitivity of 78 and 80 percent, respectively.

The mass spec-based proteomic test identified women who gave birth at or before 35 weeks gestation with an area under the receiver operating curve of .93.

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