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preeclampsia

The company said it expects core molecular testing revenue between $115 million and $125 million and SARS-CoV-2 revenue between $15 million and $20 million.

The company performed 84,067 total tests in Q3 but missed the analysts' average estimates on the top and bottom lines.

The investment bank projects medium-term revenue growth in the low teens, thanks to new test launches and expanded payor contracts for the company.

The company, which went public in June, has had to deal with issues with the US DOJ, and some private insurers. Its CEO's tenure at Sequenom was also marred by a scandal.

During the second quarter, the company performed 75,017 tests for noninvasive prenatal testing, carrier screening, and SARS-CoV-2.

The coverage comes after the women's health diagnostics firm went public last month, seeking up to $100 million in the offering.

Using exome-enriched RNA sequencing and machine learning, researchers tracked down a set of circulating maternal transcripts for predicting severe early-onset preeclampsia.

Under a two-year partnership, the companies plan to discover targets and disease mechanisms for infertility and pregnancy-related conditions, including preeclampsia.

The companies plan to explore opportunities to use Thermo Fisher's LC-MS instrumentation to develop tools to determine the risk for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

The researchers hope to eventually develop a point-of-care assay to detect conditions that lead to high-risk pregnancies before symptoms occur.

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