Plasmodium

Researchers used genomic and transcriptomic data of isolates from seven Southeast Asian countries to find resistance-relevant pathways and expression quantitative trait loci.

This Week In Science

In this week's Science, how the periwinkle produces vinblastine, and IDing P. falciparum genes.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: functional profiling of Plasmodium genome, a self-inactivating rabies virus, and more.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: RNA-seq, ChIP-seq to determine metformin response; array-based approach to detect protozoa in blood; and more.

Three genetically distinct sub-populations appeared when the team sequenced and compared 48 clinical isolates of Plasmodium knowlesi and five lab lines.

A chromosome 4 locus near glycophorin-coding genes appears to decrease the risk of severe malaria in African children, particularly those from East Africa.

The results showed that mammalian-infecting Plasmodium evolved contemporaneously with their hosts, with little evidence of parasite host-switching on an evolutionary scale.

A public-private consortium formed to investigate multi-drug resistance in malaria this week reached the end of a five-year, €2.8 million (about $3.6 million) project having identified a number of genetic markers related to drug resistance and developed a highly sensitive and spe

This article has been updated from a previous version to correct the name and title of an interview subject.

Scientists from the US Centers for Disease Control determined that a so-called "nested" PCR assay is more effective than easier-to-perform semi-nested or single-tube multiplex PCR assays for detecting Plasmodium, the parasite that causes malaria.

Researchers are refining a tool to predict a woman's risk of developing breast cancer, according to the Guardian.

According to Stat News, the partial government shutdown in the US could soon affect the ability of the Food and Drug Administration to review new drugs.

In PNAS this week: gypsy moth genome sequenced, phylogenomic analysis of Polyneopterans, and more.

CNN reports that people's genes tend to have a greater influence on their risk of developing disease than their environment, but it varies by phenotype.