plague

An analysis of 3,800-year-old Yersinia pestis isolates pushed the advent of flea-based plague transmission back to around 4,000 years ago, earlier than once proposed.

Max Planck researchers reconstructed the genomes of six Yersinia pestis samples that date back between 4,800 years and 3,700 years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: plague patterns in Kyrgyzstan, trypanosomiasis susceptibility variants, and more.

More than a dozen Yersinia pestis sub-populations turned up in a genome sequence and genotype analysis of strains collected across the country over 18 years.

Using a sixth century sample from Germany, researchers reconstructed a high-coverage genome sequence for the Yersinia pestis strain involved in the Justinian plague. 

Arnold Böcklin: The Plague (1898)

Max Planck researchers traced the plague from the Mediterranean to Northern Europe, Russia, and China.

Researchers relied on three typing methods to define two Yersinia pestis sub-populations that largely cluster by elevation in plague-prone regions of Uganda.

Genetic analysis indicated that Y. pestis was introduced to Europe in several waves while also persisting in a reservoir.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: exploration of Yersinia pestis origins, modifier for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and more.

A genomic analysis of ancient human teeth finds that Yersinia pestis has been infecting people longer than previously thought.

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Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has released the results of a genetic ancestry analysis, the Boston Globe reports.

Retraction Watch's Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus report that Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital have recommended that more than 30 papers from a former researcher be retracted.

Thomas Steitz, who won the 2009 chemistry Nobel Prize for his ribosome work, has died, the Washington Post reports.

In PLOS this week: mechanisms for genes implicated in coronary artery disease, rumen microbes and host genetics influence cow methane production, and more.