plague

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: gene editing-based strategy to screen for immune system regulators, ancient plague patterns, and more.

Using sequences from a 4,900-year-old Swedish gravesite, researchers identified a pathogenic form of Yersinia pestis circulating in Europe during the Neolithic Period.

Using newly sequenced and existing plague genomes, researchers saw signs that the Second Plague Pandemic may have involved multiple introductions to Europe.

An analysis of 3,800-year-old Yersinia pestis isolates pushed the advent of flea-based plague transmission back to around 4,000 years ago, earlier than once proposed.

Max Planck researchers reconstructed the genomes of six Yersinia pestis samples that date back between 4,800 years and 3,700 years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: plague patterns in Kyrgyzstan, trypanosomiasis susceptibility variants, and more.

More than a dozen Yersinia pestis sub-populations turned up in a genome sequence and genotype analysis of strains collected across the country over 18 years.

Using a sixth century sample from Germany, researchers reconstructed a high-coverage genome sequence for the Yersinia pestis strain involved in the Justinian plague. 

Arnold Böcklin: The Plague (1898)

Max Planck researchers traced the plague from the Mediterranean to Northern Europe, Russia, and China.

Researchers relied on three typing methods to define two Yersinia pestis sub-populations that largely cluster by elevation in plague-prone regions of Uganda.

Pages

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

Nature calls for genomics to become part of the World Health Organization's cholera surveillance approach.

Vox explores a proposal to institute a lottery system to award grant funds.

In Genome Biology this week: gut microbiome study of individuals from Tanzania and Botswana, sixth version of the Network of Cancer Genes database, and more.