plague

Max Planck researchers reconstructed the genomes of six Yersinia pestis samples that date back between 4,800 years and 3,700 years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: plague patterns in Kyrgyzstan, trypanosomiasis susceptibility variants, and more.

More than a dozen Yersinia pestis sub-populations turned up in a genome sequence and genotype analysis of strains collected across the country over 18 years.

Using a sixth century sample from Germany, researchers reconstructed a high-coverage genome sequence for the Yersinia pestis strain involved in the Justinian plague. 

Arnold Böcklin: The Plague (1898)

Max Planck researchers traced the plague from the Mediterranean to Northern Europe, Russia, and China.

Researchers relied on three typing methods to define two Yersinia pestis sub-populations that largely cluster by elevation in plague-prone regions of Uganda.

Genetic analysis indicated that Y. pestis was introduced to Europe in several waves while also persisting in a reservoir.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: exploration of Yersinia pestis origins, modifier for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and more.

A genomic analysis of ancient human teeth finds that Yersinia pestis has been infecting people longer than previously thought.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating the handling of samples at four Department of Defense labs, the New York Times reports.

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University of California, San Diego, researchers have developed a gene drive to control a fruit-destroying fly.

A new study of a β-thalassemia gene therapy appears promising, according to NPR.

Futurism writes that gene doping could be the next generation of cheating in sports.

In Nature this week: hair color genes, hybridization between 13-year and 17-year cicadas, and more.