pancreatic cancer

Investigators published an initial report on the method, which they call cfMeDIP-Seq, last week, and are now hoping to move to analysis of samples from longitudinal health studies.

The approach, called cfMeDIP-seq, could distinguish early-stage pancreatic cancer from healthy controls and differentiate several types of cancer.

The approach allows scientists to look at single amino acid variants linked to diseases like cancer and could aid the investigation of tumor heterogeneity.

The company is developing a blood-based liquid biopsy test based on the method to monitor 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels in cell-free tumor DNA.  

The company also published a study describing ImmRay PanCan-D biomarker signature that it said could be used to detect early-stage pancreatic cancer.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's technology is based on set of patient-cell derived gene signatures for classifying four pancreatic subtypes.

One of the variants leads to increased phosphorylation of a signaling pathway as well as to increased cell proliferation, hinting at how it contributes to disease risk.

A phylogenetic analysis that included multiple samples per patient suggests overlapping driver mutations make their way into multiple metastases in each patient.

The FDA granted the assay's status based on its ability to detect both ovarian and pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic individuals over the age of 65.

The firm has collected evidence supporting the use of its PancraGen to providing the same molecular information for samples from biliary strictures and solid pancreatic lesions as it has done for years in pancreatic cyst fluid.

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Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.

The New York Times reports that evidence linking trauma in one generation to epigenetic effects that influence subsequent generations may be overstated.

ScienceInsider reports that US National Institutes of Health researchers were told in the fall they could not obtain new human fetal tissue.

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.