obesity

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: parent-of-origin effects, framework to uncover clinically important mutations from whole genome sequence data, and more.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic adaption in Inuit people to a high-protein and fat diet, and more.

Adaptations include changes to fatty acid regulatory enzymes that seem to protect against potential heart disease-related effects of a high-fat diet.

Using epigenetic data, expression profiles, gene editing, and more, researchers uncovered interactions in fat precursor cells that may explain FTO's role in obesity.

Weight-loss surgeries affect patients' gut microbiomes, according to a team of Swedish researchers.

Researchers detected a truncating mutation in the carboxypeptidase E gene in members of a Sudanese family affected by extreme obesity, glucose metabolism problems, and other symptoms.

The researchers published a proof of principle in Nature Communications of a panel designed to look at epigenetic variation in adipose tissue and are using it to study obesity and metabolic syndromes. 

Women whose 21-SNP panel result indicated they were at high risk of obesity were less likely to respond to exercise by losing weight or body fat.

Through unbiased and targeted metabolite testing on urine samples from thousands of individuals in the US and the UK, researchers have narrowed in on urine compounds that coincide with body mass index.

Through their meta-analyses, consortium researchers found roles for a number of pathways in obesity risk and highlighted the varied effects of loci on men and women.

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The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.