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obesity

Just Another Diet

Washington Post columnist writes that she is skeptical about DNA-based diets.

In Science this week: sequencing study of 523 ancient individuals from South and Central Asia, and more.

Different biological processes appear to drive body mass index during infancy and later in childhood and adulthood, which could inform obesity prevention strategies.

A gene-environment study involving more than 18,000 individuals suggests jogging and other forms of exercise may modify the genetic risk for obesity.

Rhythm has a drug called setmelanotide in Phase III development for genetic obesity disorders associated with variants within the melanocortin-4 pathway.

The researchers found that while BMI broadly increased over time in their Norwegian cohort, genetically predisposed individuals were more highly affected.

The firm, Phenomix Sciences, anticipates that its test will help drive adoption of medications for obesity at a time when patients are reluctant to take them.

But Useful?

Researchers question the value of a predictive genetic test for obesity, NPR reports.

Ah, Feel Full Now

People reports that researchers have uncovered genetic variants that lead people to always feel full.

In a study of more than 300,000 participants, middle-aged individuals with a high polygenic score weighed nearly 30 pounds more on average than those with lower scores.

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GenomeWeb reports that Veritas Genetics is suspending its US operations.

A Brazilian-led team of researchers reports it has generated a sugarcane genome assembly that encompasses more than 99 percent of its genome.

Certain plasma proteins could be used to gauge a person's age and whether they are aging well, according to HealthDay News.

In Science this week: approach to measure microRNA targeting efficiency, strategy to conduct high-throughput chemical screens at single-cell resolution, and more.