non-small cell lung cancer

GeneStrat is a blood-based test using a droplet digital PCR platform that detects mutations relevant to patient treatment in non-small cell lung cancer.

According to a new study, the company returns results for more than 90 percent of its GeneStrat tests within 72 hours and aims to bring that down to 48 hours.

The test, which the company plans to launch later this year, will use MALDI-based proteomics to assess patients' likelihood of responding to immunotherapies.

Eleven laboratories that are part of Thermo's OncoNetwork Consortium tested the Oncomine Lung cfDNA assay on reference samples.

The deal gives the firm access to Bioyong's network of hospital-installed mass specs on which it hopes to place assays including its Veristrat lung cancer test.

Bioyong will invest in test development as well as validation, regulatory approval, and commercialization in China and, possibly, other Asia-Pacific countries.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: circulating tumor cells may be useful for tracking disease, analysis of demethylation in endosperm seed tissue, and more.

The partners aim to identify a microRNA-based signature that can predict lung cancer patient response to Bristol-Myers Squibb's immunotherapy Opdivo.

The assay, which was initially approved in June 2015, can now be used on an automated slide stainer which the company said is used in labs all over the world.

N-of-One will provide treatment strategies and clinical trial opportunities for patients based on Inivata's ctDNA liquid biopsy test.

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Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.