neuroblastoma

This Week in Science

In Science this week: sequencing of neuroblastomas uncovers alterations linked to prognosis, and more.

DNA sequence data from 416 neuroblastoma cases led to informative alterations affecting genes from telomere maintenance, RAS, or TP53 pathways.

Researchers profiled cancer gene mutations, expression, protein patterns, and other features in 23 recurrent or metastatic cases of olfactory neuroblastoma.

The work offers a proof of concept for the notion that dynamic models of signaling could serve as more effective biomarkers than discrete molecular markers.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genetic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma, and more.

Using funds from the California precision medicine initiative, the group will use its bioinformatics expertise to match patients to treatments in pediatric clinical trials.

In Genome Biology this week: intra-tumor heterogeneity assessed with single-cell RNA sequencing, common epigenetic alterations in tumors, and more.

Researchers found alterations that activate the RAS-MAPK pathway in 18 of 23 relapse neuroblastoma tumors tested.

Entrectinib is Ignyta's lead product that the biotech is investigating in patients with tumors characterized by TrkA, TrkB, TrkC, ROS1, and ALK markers.

NEW YORK (Genomeweb) — A study comprehensively analyzing the genomes of more than 1,500 neuroblastoma cases has better determined the prognostic significance of ALK mutations and other alterations in neuroblastoma, and has biochemically investigated many of these variants to determine which ones

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An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.