murine leukemia virus

A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.

Two recently published studies suggest that laboratory contamination was the likely cause of previous evidence linking murine viruses to CFS, highlighting the fact that researchers conducting PCR experiments should be extremely cautious about both inherently contaminated commercial reagents and contamination from laboratory manipulation.

The findings support a prior study that identified a similar virus in many CFS sufferers. However, it also conflicts with the results of several other studies that failed to detect gene sequences from either virus in CFS patients, raising questions about the PCR methods employed.

A new analysis examines the gender gap among paper authors in the sciences and says it may take decades or more to close.

Researchers have uncovered signals of selection that may enable the Bajau people to free five hundreds of feet deep, Reuters reports.

In Science this week: paternally inherited cis-regulatory structural variants in autism, and more.

A new report outlines issues facing the implementation of personalized medicine in the UK, the Independent reports.