murine leukemia virus

A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.

Two recently published studies suggest that laboratory contamination was the likely cause of previous evidence linking murine viruses to CFS, highlighting the fact that researchers conducting PCR experiments should be extremely cautious about both inherently contaminated commercial reagents and contamination from laboratory manipulation.

The findings support a prior study that identified a similar virus in many CFS sufferers. However, it also conflicts with the results of several other studies that failed to detect gene sequences from either virus in CFS patients, raising questions about the PCR methods employed.

The UK's Human Fertility and Embryology Authority calls for consumer genetic testing companies to warn customers that testing could uncover family secrets, according to the Guardian.

The New York Times reports that United Nations delegates have been discussing how to govern the genetic resources of the deep sea.

Researchers have transplanted edited cells into mice that appear to combat cocaine addiction, New Scientist reports.

In PNAS this week: analysis of proteolytic enzymes secreted by circulating tumor cells, phylogenetic study of Fv1 evolution, and more.