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murine leukemia virus

A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.

Two recently published studies suggest that laboratory contamination was the likely cause of previous evidence linking murine viruses to CFS, highlighting the fact that researchers conducting PCR experiments should be extremely cautious about both inherently contaminated commercial reagents and contamination from laboratory manipulation.

The findings support a prior study that identified a similar virus in many CFS sufferers. However, it also conflicts with the results of several other studies that failed to detect gene sequences from either virus in CFS patients, raising questions about the PCR methods employed.

A man has confessed to the rape and murder of developmental biologist Suzanne Eaton, according to the New York Times.

The Irish Times reports that US lawmakers and law enforcement agencies are concerned about ties between the US and Chinese genomics firms.

Parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy tell the Washington Post they are pushing to get insurance coverage of Novartis's Zolgensma.

In PNAS this week: gene mutations in individuals with syndromic craniosynostosis, putative colorectal cancer drivers, and more.