murine leukemia virus

A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.

Two recently published studies suggest that laboratory contamination was the likely cause of previous evidence linking murine viruses to CFS, highlighting the fact that researchers conducting PCR experiments should be extremely cautious about both inherently contaminated commercial reagents and contamination from laboratory manipulation.

The findings support a prior study that identified a similar virus in many CFS sufferers. However, it also conflicts with the results of several other studies that failed to detect gene sequences from either virus in CFS patients, raising questions about the PCR methods employed.

A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.