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murine leukemia virus

A study published this week provides the most definitive evidence to date disproving previous reports that used molecular testing methods such as qPCR to establish a link between chronic fatigue syndrome, or myalgic encephalomyelitis, and various murine leukemia viruses.

Two recently published studies suggest that laboratory contamination was the likely cause of previous evidence linking murine viruses to CFS, highlighting the fact that researchers conducting PCR experiments should be extremely cautious about both inherently contaminated commercial reagents and contamination from laboratory manipulation.

The findings support a prior study that identified a similar virus in many CFS sufferers. However, it also conflicts with the results of several other studies that failed to detect gene sequences from either virus in CFS patients, raising questions about the PCR methods employed.

The New York Times reports that a series of emails show how Department of Health and Human Services officials sought to silence the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A new initiative aims to move Australia's genome sequencing labs onto one system, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

In PLOS this week: recessive mutation tied to early-onset dilated cardiomyopathy, epigenetic analysis of lung adenocarcinoma, and more.

Two COVID-19 vaccine developers have released their trial protocols to build public trust, the New York Times reports.