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multiple myeloma

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Retrotransposon movement in somatic cells may introduce insertions in the genome that contribute to tumorigenesis in certain cancer types, according to a study in the early, online edition of Science today by members of the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network

Skyline will collaborate with Janssen to develop a test to identify patients at increased risk of side effects from a multiple myeloma drug.

Recent collaboration agreements between the company and researchers at the Moffitt Cancer Center and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging will further its "intention of building a portfolio of oncology-related assays using selected-reaction monitoring," said an official.

The work will focus on the development of mass spec assays for measuring signaling and repair pathway proteins for clinical tumor biopsy analysis.

The company plans two new versions of its MyPRS test later this year, including a pharmacogenomic enhancement called MyPRS RX and a version called MyPRS Plus that will perform myeloma subgroup analysis.

"It may be possible to use available drugs on the shelf that are effective in melanoma to treat myeloma patients with similar mutations," said Kenneth Anderson, the program director and chief of hematologic neoplasias at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, adding that he envisions a "very rapid bench-to-bedside translation."

Based on their whole-genome or exome analyses of multiple myeloma samples from 38 individuals, members of the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium have learned more about known pathways contributing to the disease and identified several previously unidentified genetic players.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.