MS

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: epigenetic change linked to glioblastomas, rare and low-frequency variants contributing to multiple sclerosis risk, and more.

In a meta-analysis of nearly 70,000 individuals, researchers estimated that low-frequency coding variants contribute about 5 percent of multiple sclerosis risk.

A team led by the University of British Columbia homed in on a variant that linked to increased liver enzyme levels and liver injury during interferon-β treatment.

A large meta-analysis and functional genomic assessment of a risky HLA haplotype uncovered hypomethylation that alters immune-related expression at the locus.

Linguamatics' I2E natural language processing engine helps Sanofi match HLA alleles with multiple sclerosis and associated drug treatments.

The Regeneron Genetics Center will sequence the full exomes of all DNA samples in the non-profit group's open-access biospecimen repository.

Qualified patients will have immediate access to IQuity's MS test, with expected access later to an IBD-IBS test, and a fibromyalgia test.

The study aims to identify genetic markers of multiple sclerosis, including ones that can be used for disease diagnosis.

The partners will integrate genomic, imaging, and other data to identify new therapies and personalize treatments for patients with neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

With its recently launched BCRquest.com data analysis hub, BC Platforms has teamed with the Accelerated Cure Project for MS and Biogen.

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Germany's Project DEAL has come to an agreement with the publisher Wiley over journal access and open-access publishing, ScienceInsider reports.

A Canadian panel recommends public coverage of the gene therapy Kymriah if its cost comes down, the Globe and Mail reports.

Researchers uncover additional loci associated with lifespan, which the Telegraph says could be folded into a genetic test.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: new accurate quantification by sequencing approach, CNV breakpoints in Plasmodium falciparum, and more.