miscarriage | GenomeWeb

miscarriage

The firm reported $3.5 million in revenue for the three months ended Dec. 31, 2016, and $12.9 million for the full year.

The firm reported 29 percent growth in its overall testing revenues, driven mainly by higher reproductive test volume and higher per-test revenue.

CombiMatrix said the move will increase access to the test in the state for women experiencing recurrent pregnancy loss.

The company's testing was successful in more than 90 percent of cases over almost four years, and detected a wide variety of abnormalities.

The company reported an 18 percent increase in the number of reproductive health tests completed during the quarter. 

The company feels it could be an attractive target for mergers, but is also keeping an eye out for IP acquisition options of its own.

The company said its revenue increase was driven by gains in test volume, particularly in miscarriage analysis and preimplantation genetic screening for couples undergoing IVF.

The research project, led by Kathy Niakan of the Francis Crick Institute, will involve editing several genes thought to be important to embryo development.

The UK Human Fertilisation & Embryology Authority is to consider an application submitted by researchers seeking to perform gene editing on human embryos.

Scientists from The Francis Crick Institute have applied to UK regulators to use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in an upcoming study of miscarriage.

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An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

Research funding in Canada is to remain mostly the same, ScienceInsider reports.

In Science this week: random DNA replication errors play role in cancer, and more.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation embarks on an open-access publishing path.