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Lung Cancer

News and reporting on lung cancer.

A study published earlier this spring by OSU researchers identified a set of miRNA signatures in blood that could yield a new test for lung cancer development and prognosis.

Using gene expression data combined with bioinformatic analyses, scientists at the University of Georgia and China's Jilin University are developing a urine-based protein biomarker test for gastric cancer that they hope to offer as a direct-to-consumer diagnostic.

The technology, which is being commercialized by start-up firm MagArray, is aimed primarily at drug screening applications, allowing pharmaceutical firms to test compounds against a wide number of proteins for off-target binding, said one of the researchers.

The trials will evaluate biomarker panels for lung, colon, and prostate cancer, and may include a comparison of proteomics-based lung cancer tests from Somalogic and Celera.

The company released results from studies of its six-protein diagnostic panel for lung cancer at this month's AACR meeting and this summer may take part in a 300-patient trial sponsored by the NCI's Early Detection Research Network.

The patents cover the selection of non-small cell lung cancer patients, colorectal cancer patients, and head and neck cancer patients for treatment with drugs targeting the epidermal growth-factor receptor pathway.

Med BioGene's shareholders have approved the deal, which gives Precision rights to commercialize Med BioGene's gene expression-based test for early stage non-small-cell lung cancer.

The investigators linked over-expression of the miRNA with increased cancer cell migration from lung cancers.

The new offer comes a month after Signal filed suit against Med BioGene for negotiating a licensing deal for the LungExpress Dx test with Precision Therapeutics.

Called plasmadiscover41, the panel comprises 41 plasma proteins thought to be potential biomarkers for various cancers. The company is also working on a 50- to 60-protein panel for CSF biomarkers that it plans to introduce in the second quarter.

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The Economist reports that it is increasingly easier to analyze the metabolites people give off, potentially revealing personal information about them.

A controversial paper on the gender gap in science has been corrected, according to BuzzFeed News.

The Los Angeles Times reports that only a third of California students meet the state's new science standards.

In Science this week: evidence of interbreeding between the ancestors of West Africans and an unknown archaic human, and more.