leukemia

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic variants associated with HIV infection risk, protein biomarkers of schistosomiasis, and more.

The startup is launching an instrument that will process up to 10,000 single cells for DNA sequencing as well as a panel that will target AML genes. 

The startup will use the funds to commercialize its single-cell analysis platform, which is based in part on droplet microfluidic technology licensed from UCSF.

RPRD will expand the availability of its PGx testing services to South Korea, and Orient Bio will diversify its business to include precision medicine and clinical PGx.

Genome and transcriptome sequences from hundreds of pediatric cancer cases led to somatic mutations and fusions suspected of producing potentially targetable antigens.

The RealTime PCR instrument identifies AML patients with IDH2 mutations who can be treated with Celgene's Idhifa.

The test is intended to detect FLT3 mutations in order to select patients for treatment with Novartis' Rydapt, and has also been approved by the US FDA.

The New York Times reports that a number of companies and research institutes are pursuing gene therapies.

In Genome Research this week: population dynamics of E. coli infection, lncRNA expression changes in macaque aging, and more.

A US Food and Drug Administration panel recommends that the agency approve a gene therapy for pediatric leukemia, the New York Times reports.

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Rare gene mutations are guiding the search for drugs to manage chronic pain without opioids, according to CNBC.

The new Francis Crick Institute building can get too noisy for some researchers to concentrate, according to the Guardian.

CBS News reports that there are still many vacancies at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but that it's uncertain whether they will be filled.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: pipeline to analyze and visualize bacterial genomes, database of global set of human genomes, and more.