kidney injury

The partners will work together to see whether cell-free DNA levels can be used to predict organ injury in kidney transplantation and improve clinical outcomes.

Astute is working with Fosun on Chinese trials for the test that it will use to gather data for a submission to the Chinese Food and Drug Administration.

The company will offer the test, which measures levels of two proteins to predict breast cancer risk in healthy women, through Innovative Diagnostic Laboratory.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – With the recent clearance by the US Food and Drug Administration of its NephroCheck test for acute kidney injury, Astute Medical has achieved a milestone under the terms of its loan agreement with CRG which releases from CRG up to $30 million to support commercialization of

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Astute Medical said this week that it has received US Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for its NephroCheck Test System, a protein biomarker-based test for assessing risk of acute kidney injury.

A paper published last week in PLOS One indicates that Astute Medical's NephroCheck test can help predict development of acute kidney failure in patients after undergoing cardiac surge

Researchers have completed a prospective, multi-center clinical trial validating the performance of Astute Medical's NephroCheck protein biomarker test for acute kidney disease.

While RNAi drug developers continue to pursue major indications such as cancer and hepatitis C, a number of these companies are looking to niche diseases as good opportunities to apply the gene-silencing technology.

The National Institutes of Health last month announced two funding opportunities with potential microRNA components, seeking grant proposals in the areas of acute kidney injury and the genomic basis of neurodevelopment and mental disorders.

A study published this week has demonstrated the ability of Astute Medical's NephroCheck protein biomarker test to identify patients at risk of acute kidney injury.

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NPR reports that Turkish high school students will no longer study evolution.

Researchers report they sequenced and identified plant species in an "al fresco" laboratory.

An Australian team searches for genetic alterations linked to depression in hopes of developing personalized treatments, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

In PNAS this week: host contributors to typhoid fever risk, effects of obesity-related variants near TMEM18, and more.