irritable bowel syndrome | GenomeWeb

irritable bowel syndrome

IQuity's current tests analyze gene expression patterns detected in mRNA, but the firm is also exploring the diagnostic potential of long non-coding RNAs.

The test, which detects various bacterial species in fecal samples, is expected to be submitted to US regulators before the end of this year.

Genetic Analysis CEO Kari Stenersen said the deal is a "commercial breakthrough" for the Oslo-based company.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The nonprofit Crohn's and Colitis Canada has awarded nearly C$800,000 (US$740,000) to fund three omics research projects that will investigate genes involved in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and a possible method for treating such diseases.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – An international team that includes members of the "Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract," or MetaHIT, consortium has come up with a new method for putting together microbial genomes and identifying species from metagenomic sequence data.

Genetic Analysis said this week that its GA-map IBS Dysbiosis test is now CE marked and available for use on clinical samples in European labs.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Applied BioCode today said it has signed a license and supply agreement covering its barcoded magnetic bead (BMB) technology with molecular diagnostics firm Genetic Analysis.

To assay a common risk factor for gastrointestinal ailments, Montreal-based Micropharma this week announced this week it has completed development of a new digital PCR-based test.

By the end of 2015, Norwegian molecular diagnostics firm Genetic Analysis hopes to have a microarray-based test for diagnosing dysbiosis in irritable bowel syndrome patients cleared for clinical use in both Europe and the US.

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In Science this week: genetically modified flu virus could be key to new live vaccines, and more.

Biomedical research projects are generating a ton of data that still needs to be analyzed, NPR reports.

Theranos is retiring some of its board members, including Henry Kissinger and George Shultz, Business Insider reports.

The heads of 29 scientific societies and some 2,300 researchers call on President-elect Donald Trump to rely on and support science in two separate letters.