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influenza

In PLOS this week: alternatively spliced form of FBXO38 contributes to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, evolution of the avian influenza virus H9N2, and more.

A few key loci appear to contribute to a lasting immune response following childhood immunizations against meningococcal bacteria, tetanus, or Haemophilus influenzae type B.

To Stop Bird Flu

Reuters reports that UK researchers have edited chicken cells in the lab to be resistant to bird flu.

Flu test sales were the second-highest for a quarter in the firm's history but were still $17.4 million lower than the year-ago quarter due to a much less intense flu season.

The in vitro diagnostic is designed to detect whole gene segments for influenza A and B viruses and can characterize viruses as seasonal or nonseasonal.

Metascape uses data from over 40 knowledgebases and 10 model organisms to provide functional enrichment, interactome analysis, gene annotation, and membership search capabilities.

Vox writes that lab mishaps involving pathogens are quite common.

Starting Up Again

ScienceInsider reports that some risky flu studies that came to a halt a few years back may soon resume.

Reuters reports that UK researchers are using gene-editing tools to develop flu-resistant chickens.

In PLOS this week: Madariaga virus linked to pediatric acute febrile illness cases in Haiti, tool to screen for viral infection in human cell lines, and more.

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Russian CRISPR researcher moves along with plans to ultimately alter the genes of embryos of deaf couples, though awaits regulatory approval, Nature News reports.

University of California, San Francisco, researchers have uncovered a gene mutations that appears to make a father-son duo more efficient sleepers.

NPR reports a large health insurer has begun to cover some pharmacogenetic tests for psychiatric drugs.

In PLOS this week: genome-wide association study of non-syndromic orofacial cleft subtypes, epigenetic and transcriptomic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and more.