inflammatory bowel disease

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gene variant linked to inflammatory bowel disease, and more.

New research suggests that some risky and protective variants in the LRRK2 gene have shared genetic effects in Crohn's disease and Parkinson's disease.

The agreement, with Genetic Analysis of Oslo, involves technology to detect gut dysbiosis and investment for additional tests.

A team has identified disease loci for Crohn's and ulcerative colitis using fine mapping alongside high-density genotyping. 

The researchers plan to profile patients with both Adaptive Biotechnologies' ImmunoSeq platform and 10x Genomics' single-cell immune repertoire profiling technology. 

The firm's recent funding round will support its CLIA-certified laboratory that opened last year and the launch of its first RNA-based diagnostic test.

The Dutch firm expects its product to be the first commercial test on the market to diagnose IBD by analyzing a patient's gut microbiome.

The project aims to elucidate markers of response and non-response to current treatment regimens, and to identify new therapies.

A genome-wide association study of more than 2,700 individuals with Crohn's disease uncovered prognosis-related loci distinct from those linked to disease risk.

In Genome Biology this week: 4C-seq to examine chromatin patterns in IBD, Iberian lynx demographic patterns, and more.


An opinion piece in the Guardian argues that President Donald Trump is uninterested in science and that might not be a bad thing for the field.

The San Francisco Chronicle reports the Veterans Affairs Health System is studying whether genetic testing can help prescribe better depression therapies.

Stat News reports that Spark Therapeutics' Luxturna is now being used to treat a wider array of patients.

In Genome Biology this week: transcription factor use among brittle stars, single-cell RNA sequencing strategy, and more.