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The UCSF-based Blood Systems Research Institute will conduct research using RainDance's digital PCR platforms as part of a new $20 million amfAR Institute for HIV Cure Research.

In PNAS this week: common variants that influence viral load in HIV patients, tumor evolution patterns, and more.

The scientists were able to edit CCR5, the receptor used by HIV to enter cells, without killing the stem cells.

Through a genome-wide association study, an international team of researchers has linked polymorphisms of large effect to host contribution to HIV viral load variation.

The method simplifies previous techniques, and preliminary testing using a microfluidic device indicates it could ultimately be used in low-resource settings.

The scientists fused Cas9 to zinc finger proteins to reduce off-target activity, essentially replacing the other nucleases that had been used with zinc fingers.

Following a beta evaluation of the system, a virology lab in Sheffield, UK, ran a workflow assessment and found improvements with the system.

In PLOS this week: parasitoid wasp sequences in butterflies and moths, nuclear sub-proteome of T. cruzi, and more.

The DxN Veris was recently launched as a CE-marked product with a menu of viral load tests, and will launch in a few years in the US with STD and HAI assays. 

Roche's program will now include early infant HIV diagnostics for low- and middle-income countries.

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The New York City Police Department will be removing DNA profiles from a local database if they are from people who were never convicted of a crime, the New York Times reports.

Science reports that accusations of sexual assault against a microbiome researcher has also led to questions about his academic certifications.

Wired reports that researchers are analyzing the DNA fish leave behind in water to study their populations.

In Science this week: comprehensive cellular map of the human thymus, evidence of admixture between the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovan and a 'superarchaic' population.