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HCV

The device is expected to be used with Genedrive's hepatitis C virus assay, which recently received CE-IVD marking.

The alliance follows a marketing deal signed with Sysmex Europe that covers Europe, the Middle East, and Africa.

The two companies plan to secure required initial regulatory approvals in individual African territories before expanding to other areas in the region.

The British-based firm says that its assay detects hepatitis C via a single-use, disposable cartridge within 90 minutes of testing. 

The researchers found that Cepheid's Xpert HCV viral load assay used at the point of care performed at levels comparable to a laboratory test.

An OpenArray panel designed to simultaneously test for 17 viruses and 13 bacteria and protozoa was able to detect pathogens from human blood donor samples with an accuracy of about 95 percent.

Despite highly effective HCV drugs, testing for resistance mutations is important to prevent the spread of resistant strains and to tailor treatment.

The firm said the assay provides flexible automation and accurately identifies all six HCV genotypes as well as subtypes 1a and 1b.

Hologic said that HCV therapeutic options are evolving rapidly, and the approval will enable physicians to quickly decide on the best treatments.

The test is performed in less than an hour using a buccal cheek swab, and runs on Genedrive’s hand-held real-time PCR instrument.

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Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.