glioblastoma

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter
NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – A pair of studies published online this weekend point to histone and chromatin remodeling genes as culprits in a subset of brain cancers occurring in children and young adults.

By Adam Bonislawski
With DNA-based affinity agents gaining prominence as tools for protein capture, scientists and biotech firms are exploring biomarker assays that simultaneously report both genetic and proteomic data.

A sampling of molecular diagnostics and pharmacogenomics abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting.

The goal is to identify patient-specific rearrangements in the primary tumor, and then check for the presence of that rearrangement in the patient's blood during treatment in order to determine tumor progression and monitor therapy response.

A donation will fund the Yale Program in Brain Tumor Research, an effort to sequence and analyze tumors for important mutations.

Using microarray analyses, researchers have detected a stem cell-related gene expression pattern in an aggressive subtype of glioblastoma multiforme that involves cells expressing the transmembrane protein CD133.

Four projects have received funding from the NIH, including a proteomics-directed study targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and an NCI multi-site prospective study of glioma patients.

In particular, George Mason University researcher Emanuel Petricoin expressed concerns about the project's plan to use samples from different patient cohorts for its discovery and verification stages.

The combined grants are worth nearly $650,000 and are meant to support work on treatments for cancer and Huntington's disease.

The slew of PGx abstracts presented by the drug giant at the annual oncology meeting highlighted its “focused approach to cancer drug development through the identification and validation of molecular targets,” Pfizer said.

Pages

An analysis of UK Biobank data finds hemochromatosis to be more prevalent than thought, according to the BBC.

An analysis finds that female biomedical researchers receive fewer prizes than male ones, and when they do win prizes, they are less prestigious.

In Nature this week: improved genomic analysis using a graph genome reference, tumor mutational burden could predict clinical response to immune checkpoint inhibitors, and more.

Federal researchers tell the Los Angeles Times that the shutdown is causing missed research opportunities as they try to keep their experiments going.