glaucoma

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: innate immune interactions with TB bug, cytoplasmic microtubule organizing center-like structure, and more.

Researchers have used the gene-editing tool to disrupt a gain-of-function mutation in mice and human tissues that leads to glaucoma.

Researchers linked loci near three genes, including one involved in limiting oxidative damage, to primary open-angle glaucoma susceptibility.

Through genetic association and functional studies, researchers from the University of California, San Diego found that risk variants in SIX6 and p16INK4a are associated with senescence of retinal ganglion cells.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Quark Pharmaceuticals announced this week that it has dosed the first patient in a Phase IIa study of QPI-1007, its siRNA-based treatment for glaucoma.

With positive phase II data on its siRNA-based glaucoma treatment in hand, Spanish RNAi drug developer Sylentis is preparing to move into phase IIb study next year, with a pivotal trial possible by 2015, according to a company official.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) –Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have won $6.4 million in funding from the National Eye Institute to investigate the genetic basis of glaucoma, with a particular focus on how the disease arises in people of African descent.

The National Institutes of Health this month awarded nearly $2 million in grant funding to support eight research projects investigating the roles of microRNAs in a variety of diseases and biological functions including psychiatric disorders, immune function, glaucoma, and cancer

This article has been updated to correct details regarding SYL1001's development timeline.

Quark Pharmaceuticals said this week that it is has assumed responsibility for conducting a phase IIa trial of its investigational RNAi-based treatment for open-angle glaucoma after amending a licensing deal for the drug with Pfizer.

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The New York Times reports that as China invests in science, it also is dealing with research fraud.

In PLOS this week: transcriptome study of a cold-tolerant plant, deep sequencing of clinical influenza A samples, and more.

The Atlantic writes that retrotransposons like BovB have proliferated in a number of genomes.

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a man who lived in China some 40,000 years ago, according to UPI.