gastrointestinal cancer

Researchers associated with the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network will publish more than 25 papers this week to discuss findings from the initiative.

The firm's Guardant360 assay will be used first to test patients for ERBB2 mutations, then guide patients to a variety of treatment arms.

The partners aim to identify master regulators in the molecular networks of GIST patients that can serve as drug targets for existing treatments.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: immunogenic mutations in GI cancers, and more.

The research may lay the groundwork for a noninvasive test for GI or other types of cancer without prior knowledge of which organ is affected.

The agreement expands the partners' alliance to include additional diseases within the gastrointestinal tract.

In GIST tumors lacking genetic mutations, researchers uncover an epimutation affecting a gene promoter.

Indivumed and Georgetown have already established a biobank and clinical database for analyzing tumor specimens to improve cancer diagnostics.

Sometimes genetic tests give inconclusive results and provide little reassurance to patients, the Associated Press reports.

Vox wonders whether gene-editing crops will be viewed similarly as genetically modified organisms of if people will give them a try.

In Science this week: research regulation and reporting requirement reform, and more.

NPR reports that government and private insurers are being slow to cover recently approved CAR-T cell therapies.