fragile X syndrome | GenomeWeb

fragile X syndrome

The firm, which makes both neurogenetic and oncology diagnostics, also provided updates on its market strategies and menu outlook.

London Health Sciences Center researchers published a study validating the accuracy of the method as a potential screening test for symptomatic male patients.

A suite of assays published today in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics tackles issues with genetic testing, making it more robust and affordable. 

A team at UC Davis is developing a method to sequence the FMR1 gene on the PacBio platform and determine its methylation status at the same time.

At Scientific American Mind, a family shares its story of fragile X syndrome.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Emory University researchers have received a roughly $8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund a study that will use whole-genome sequencing to investigate modifier genes that predispose people with FMR1 gene mutations to specific clinical outcomes.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) — Scientists from Asuragen and the New York Institute for Basic Research in Development Disabilities have published research that they claim provides the most compelling evidence to date for a relationship between AGG sequence interruptions and the risk of triplet repeat expa

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Asuragen today announced it has received a clinical laboratory permit from New York state to offer the company's Xpansion Interpreter and miRInform Thyroid tests in the state.

Meridian Bioscience said this week that it has received medical device license approval from Health Canada to market its Illumigene Mycoplasma and Pertussis assays.

Asuragen today announced results from a study demonstrating that its Xpansion Interpreter molecular test can improve the determination of a woman's risk of having a child with fragile X syndrome compared to existing risk measures.

Pages

In PLOS this week: nasal microbial communities in asthma patients; sequencing-based way to detect, track schistosomiasis; and more.

The New York Times speaks with Vanderbilt's John Anthony Capra about Neanderthal genes in modern humans.

A draft guidance from the FDA suggests the agency wants to more tightly control gene-edited animals, according to Technology Review.

Researchers were among this weekend's protesters bemoaning the new US administration, Vox reports.