esophageal cancer

DNA sequence data from hundreds of individuals suggest that age, smoking, and alcohol use coincide with the expansion of clones containing NOTCH1 and PPM1D mutations.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: immune cell profiling of wild baboons by social status, metabolomics profiling of esophageal tumors, and more.

The company beat the consensus Wall Street estimate on the top line and guided to 2018 revenues of between $21 million and $22 million.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic mutations typically associated with esophageal cancer are common in older, healthy individuals, and more.

Researchers saw frequent somatic mutations in esophageal tissue from nine individuals, including mutations under positive selection in 14 oncogenes.

Researchers hope to tease out the signature effects that different carcinogens leave on the genome to determine their contributions to disease, Mosaic reports.

Priorities for Q3 include the continued buildup of a commercial launch for the company's BarreGEN test. The firm has started a second clinical validation study for the test.

PavMed subsidiary Lucid will commercialize Case Western's EsoCheck technology to detect Barrett's esophagus, a precursor to esophageal cancer.

PavMed subsidiary Lucid Diagnostics secured exclusive global rights to develop and commercialize genetic biomarker-based diagnostic tests using EsoCheck technology.

Exome sequences from thousands of Chinese individuals with or without esophageal squamous cell carcinoma led to six new germline risk variants.

Pages

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.